021117 – From Africa to Jazz

Music From Africa to Jazz

lay down body/ the moving star hall singers 3:37
https://youtu.be/HhT1ti4n6sI

Steve Hickman Hambone Artist – live in concert! 3:07
https://youtu.be/m9kaQ3ZKPE0

“Rosie” (African American Work Song) – Production Version 2:45
https://youtu.be/LOOWcnOrqaA

Mahalia Jackson – Take My Hand, Precious Lord 4:12
https://youtu.be/N1ceCpU25vA

Bessie Griffin – Move On Up A Little Higher 4:53
https://youtu.be/dPU6vby3m84

Too Close To Heaven – Alex Bradford , “Too Close” 3:02
https://youtu.be/kDHSZogCl94

Touch The Hem Of His Garment – Sam Cooke & The Soul Stirrers 2:02
https://youtu.be/QKADAdCwpYI

Maple Leaf Rag Played by Scott Joplin 2:45
https://youtu.be/pMAtL7n_-rc

Marvin Gaye – Wholy Holy 3:11
https://youtu.be/tp6CCpTfSvs

Aretha Franklin – Wholy Holy 5:32
https://youtu.be/3EGcG9mMJgo

Bebe & Cece Winans – I.O.U. Me 4:38
https://youtu.be/IZNqQmGq_4U

Donnie McClurkin Stand 5:20
https://youtu.be/odaF0NDlgWI

JAZZ IN NEW ORLEANS

Jelly Roll Morton – Black Bottom Stomp 3:09
https://youtu.be/lcgIrAyNGGM

Original Dixieland Jazz Band “Dixie Jass Band One Step” February 26, 1917 FIRST JAZZ RECORD 2:36
https://youtu.be/UljhWqC50QU

“Mama’s Black Baby Boy” Edison Records, Graphophone cylinder 2:47
https://youtu.be/GwgKwx7orYE

George Johnson – The Whistling Coon – 1891 (The first recording by an African-American) 2:53
https://youtu.be/sVYHSlEssYY

The Laughing Song – George W. Johnson (1898) 2:23
https://youtu.be/4yvOMwHsh1A

Dorothy Moore – Funny How Time Slips Away (1976) 3:47
https://youtu.be/QlR2TpA10do

Rainy Night in Georgia — Brook Benton 3:54
https://youtu.be/yRKqfrct070?list=PLSU7QjNWaIg3fgOhXtkeyp8jkrf_kEYbg

African Chant – Original Music 3:31
https://youtu.be/qfu8QjNHnWk

FOLI (there is no movement without rhythm) original version by Thomas Roebers and Floris Leeuwenberg 10:50
https://youtu.be/lVPLIuBy9CY?list=RDcYGIbyBfspY

MISTY BLUE DOROTHY MOORE – rhythm & blues 3:33
https://youtu.be/RMONGMDEerI

Ella Fitzgerald & Louis Armstrong – Stompin’ At the Savoy 5:13
https://youtu.be/Dk1toxG81nY

Mokalamity and the wizards vision – African reggae 3:07
https://youtu.be/ztvojXoSJ_Q?list=PL_Ebw2sIa1Ios8l9V4XooanYXfVIrjNSH

Chuck Berry – Johnny B-Goode 2:35
https://youtu.be/rVT65M4mRnM

John Coltrane – Blue train 10:45
https://youtu.be/GZEQyDJYdj4?list=PLEoPXZd4xaesIdz5BhKIfG-Nq6FnvjCQy

Duke Ellington – Take The A Train 8:17
https://youtu.be/dthGrehkuEk

Miles Davis – Tutu 1986 HQ 5:18
https://youtu.be/sAMJy-PHzKE

Herbie Hancock – “Dolphin Dance”(Maiden Voyage,1965) 9:16
https://youtu.be/iB2Z2DY17yQ

Billie Holiday – Crazy He Calls Me 3:05
https://youtu.be/_mitLcbHHz8

Ella Fitzgerald – Summertime (High Quality – Remastered) 5:01
https://youtu.be/XivELBdxVRM

Lil Hardin Armstrong & Her Swing Orchestra – Oriental Swing 3:05
https://youtu.be/mMDBluSMUas

Bessie Smith (Nobody Knows You When You’re Down And Out, 1929) Jazz Legend 3:04
https://youtu.be/6MzU8xM99Uo?list=PL0aHSr7B7Rv85ypPG9aYFSm-KH-wVcAsh

Mary Lou Williams – It Ain’t Necessarily So 4:47
https://youtu.be/z4THBVc47ug?list=PL0aHSr7B7Rv85ypPG9aYFSm-KH-wVcAsh

Nancy Wilson / The Boy From Ipanema 2:16
https://youtu.be/dZuCOaHHoEE?list=PL0aHSr7B7Rv85ypPG9aYFSm-KH-wVcAsh

Carmen McRae – Take Five 1961 2:16
https://youtu.be/sNWsr6N72yQ?list=PL0aHSr7B7Rv85ypPG9aYFSm-KH-wVcAsh

Lena Horne – Stormy Weather (Early 1956 Version) 3:58
https://youtu.be/vDapU6bXsks

There are surprising African musical influences in some of Lil’s compositions from this period.  Apparently she was by this time looking into the roots of jazz because a dramatic example is found in “Perdido Street Blues” which is based on an old, old traditional rhythmic pattern: a West Aftrican shuffle dance known from Congo Square (aka Congress Square) in New Orleans from before the turn of the year 1900.

Perdido Street Blues 3:03
https://youtu.be/e4HlSsaeQBE

Miles Davis, Portia 6:06
https://youtu.be/0nuNfDYhq6Y

Miles Davis, Tomaas 5:24
https://youtu.be/RAhUpfB3oJM

Miles Davis – Red China Blues 4:05
https://youtu.be/EuKhccJi_GI

From Africa to Jazz Notes

Gospel music –root of R&B, Soul, and Rock, launched the careers of countless singers.

TAKE MY HAND, PRECIOUS LORD (1932):

Written by former bluesman, Thomas A. Dorsey,
set the musical and thematic tone for all gospel music.
The melody is from a 19th century hymn
Dorsey wrote over the deaths of his first wife and child.

MOVE ON UP A LITTLE HIGHER (1947):
Pastor and composer W. Herbert Brewster
first “hit,” selling 8 million copies.

I’M TOO CLOSE (1953):
Professor Alex Bradford was one of the first great “showmen” of gospel
a husky baritone to a sweet, sweet falsetto
he influenced many R&B, Soul, Rock and Pop artists.
known as the “Little Richard of gospel,” it is more accurate to call Little Richard the “Alex Bradford of Rock and Roll.”

WHOLY HOLY (1971):
Marvin Gaye co-wrote
album “What’s Going On.”
Aretha Franklin transformed it into a gospel classic

I.O. U. ME (1987):
artistic technological blurred the lines between secular and sacred.
topped the R&B and gospel charts and won numerous awards.

STAND (1996):
controversial minister and singer Donnie McClurkin,
A protégé of Andre Crouch
McClurkin wrote and performed this anthem to faith, courage, and endurance which catapulting him to fame. Oprah Winfrey brought attention (and massive sales) to the song when she proclaimed it her “favorite CD in the world.”

ORIGINS OF JAZZ

jazz starts 1895-1917 New Orleans

Creoles on west side of Canal St. Conservatory educated in Paris, sight reading and correct performance;

Newly freed Blacks on east side played blues, gospel and work songs memorization and improvisation and playing by ear.

1894 racial segregation law

1897 establishment of Storyville, red light district, prostitution was legal.

Recordings of jazz in 1917

Jelly Roll Morton was a Creole named Ferdinand LaMenthe and became a professor (main musician playing piano at the sporting houses)

Jazz inherited the rhythms of African music and the formal structure of European music.

The Unique Quartette recorded again in 1893, and one of their titles, “Mama’s Black Baby Boy”
1890 George W. Johnson became the first African American to record commercially.

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